A Primer in Washoku 和食

Japanese cuisine has been accepted all around the world for its elegance and deliciousness, and what better place than Kyoto to enjoy Washoku in its entirety. Three things you need to eat at Kyoto – matcha sweets, soba and tofu. And at Yoshiya Arashiyama, you can get all three under one roof. And did I…

Shibuya Matsukawa @ Toyko

Grilled eel, called unagi no kabayaki in Japanese, is a popular dish in Japan. Kabayaki is a cooking method unique to Japan where you slice open eels to remove their bones and broil them with sweet and salty sauce made from soy sauce and mirin until brown.

Yoshimura Kiyomizu-an @ Kyoto

Three things you have to eat in Kyoto –  macha-flavoured stuff, tofu and soba. You can get all three in Arashiyama, but the place to have your soba fix is at Kiyomizu.

Warayaki-ya @ Akasaka, Tokyo

In Kochi, fishermen made bonfires of using straws and cooked their catch. This technique called Warayaki is quite a spectacle to watch and tasty.

Yakiniku Hiro @ Kyoto

I realised that I have not recommended Yakiniku in my blogs, even though I go to one quite often. A recent one I went to in Kyoto was of quite good quality at a reasonable price.

Kisoji @ Shinjuku

Kisoji is a budget chain to savour Wagyu and Shabu-shabu. They have many stores across Japan and have ventured outside. And the secret to their success was not the price, it was the service.

Hakodate Sushi Kin @ Shimbashi

Back to Ginza, Ground Zero for sushi restaurants. People come here after work for a bite and then proceed to drinks in one of many hostess bars and karaokes around here. Due to its close proximity to Tsukiji, many sushi restaurants were established here. So if you have been around since 1984, you can be…

Ika Center @ Tokyo

Only in Japan can you get specialisation in one ingredient like this one. Tucked away in Nihonbashi was a restaurant that specialised in squid. And you can guessed the name of  the restaurant – Ika Center.

Teppanyaki Yasaiya @ Tokyo

This was a recommendation of a colleague. I wanted to go a good teppanyaki restaurant, no gimmicks, money not the issue. Instead of the usuals in Ginza, I was introduced to this one in Akasaka. It is different from most teppanyaki restaurant as it features vegetables as its main selling point.

Toriyoshi @ Akasaka

What could be more straightforward than yakitori? All that’s required is to chop up some chicken into bite-size chunks, skewer and hoist them over a grill, then season to taste and eat. Simple? Yes. Easy to do well? Obviously not, or there would be far more places of the caliber of Toriyoshi.

Dining on the Shinkansen

I don’t think the Japanese invented the High Speed Railway (HSR). But they have perfected the meals that you can bring on to one of these HSR trip. Every stop along the way, they serve a specialty bento 便当. The noun actually made it to Chinese, to represent a really simple lunchbox.