Minokichi @ Osaka

The Minokichi was founded in 1716 during the Kyoho period during the reign of the eighth Shogun Yoishimune as one of the eight licensed restaurants to serve freshwater fishes authorised by Shogunate’s Kyoto Administration. Today, it is a restaurant chain with branches all around Japan serving approachable keiseki meals.

Ransen @ Tokyo

Ransen is located in the basement arcade of New Otani Hotel in Tokyo. You would almost missed it as it is tucked away in the corner with a nondescript entrance. I have walked past it many times without knowing what it serves. I would now put it as one of best Kaiseki I have had…

Karyo Gion @ Kyoto

Kyoto is a magical place. Everything is prettier, meals more elaborate and tradition followed. Kaiseki was born in this lovely place. So it was only reasonable to go to a traditional Kaiseki Ryokan to try a nice Kaiseki dinner. Of course, being Kyoto it would be expensive.

Nadaman Shiodome 47 @ Tokyo

Singaporean who knew their Kaiseki would remember Nadaman in Shangri-La. I had this opportunity to try out their branch in Shiodome 47.

Harumi @ Tokyo

What poetic sadness! Everything – the view, the food, the company – was temporal. The beauty of Kaiseki (Japanese-style Chef Degustation) is that it mimics life – it’s seasonal and you never know what you are going to get. And you can never repeat it again, unless (of course) you come again the next evening.

Kitaohji Akasaka Sayro 北大路赤板茶寮

Kaiseki-ryori 懷石料理 is a multi-course Japanese dinner that is equivalent to Haute Cuisine in French cuisine. It features the ingredients of the season and showcase a whole array of style of the chef de cuisine. You never would have the same Kaiseki twice. If you are in Japan, you have to try this at least once,…