Fine Dining

The New Yorker @ SLC

When the New Yorker first opened in 1978, it oozed “cool,” thanks to its speak-easy location, elegant food and exclusive private club status.

Located in downtown, the New Yorker restaurant is one of the most iconic places for dinner in Salt Lake City.  As its name suggests, the New Yorker reflected a classic 1940s art deco elegance, with a stained-glass ceiling and luxurious banquettes, elements that originated from the historic Hotel Utah.

In its heyday as a private club, it was popular for those who attended the Utah Symphony, the Utah Opera and plays at the Capitol Theatre. Even the legendary Luciano Pavarotti ate there after a performance.

Starters

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Crispy Fried Calamari

Crispy Fried Calamari with asian slaw and sweet chile sauce

Decent, thought the coleslaw on the base was a bit too wet and made the calamari soggy after a while.

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Half-Dozen Iced Kusshi Oysters

Half-Dozen Iced Kusshi Oysters – Housemade Horseradish Cocktail Sauce and Pickled Ginger Mignonette

SLC isn’t near any sea, so when you get really good oysters like these, you ought to be thankful.

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Crispy Fried Camembert and Pear

Crispy Fried Camembert and Pear, Red pepper jelly

This is so good that we ordered a second round. Nothing beats deep fried food,  and the oozing soft camembert cheese on water table wafers is to die for.

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Chicken Liver Pâté

Chicken Liver Pâté – With wild huckleberry sauce and grilled French bread

I loved it, but the rest of the table didn’t touch much of it. I guess liver pate isn’t everyone’s game.

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Onion Soup Gratinée

Onion Soup Gratinée – Croutons, Aged Swiss and Parmesan

Classic steakhouse soup as far as I can remember. When I was little and went into The Ship Restaurant in Singapore for the first time, this was the soup that my dad ordered for me.

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Onion Soup Gratinée

The clear and flavourful beef stock consommé was clearly infused with caramelised onions, and the croutons have been soaked thoroughly with the delicious soup. The stringy, gooey Swiss cheese completed the classic soup.

Mains

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Double RR Ranch Signature Porterhouse Steak for Two

Double RR Ranch Signature Porterhouse Steak for Two

The best way to enjoy a steak is to have a porterhouse and be served the best of both world – the tender fillet and the beefy sirloin.

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Two cuts in one

It was done perfectly, though I would enjoy it more if there’s accompany butter on the porterhouse to make it more moist.

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Grilled Prime Angus New York Steak

Grilled Prime Angus New York Steak – Au Gratin Potatoes, Farmer’s Market Vegetables, Sauce Bordelaise

The single serve steak is perfectly executed with a generous amount of sides.

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Daily Fish – Grilled Seabass

Someone in the group did not eat steaks, so she ordered the Daily Fish – Grilled Seabass which was perfectly seared to crisp on one side and completely moist and flaky.

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NIce Malbec

By the end of dinner, we were so stuffed that we had to skip dessert.

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Art Deco

When a restaurant survives 40 years, they must be doing something right. The New Yorker does many things right. The ambience was elegant, the music was soft, light instrumental jazz, service was attentive and friendly, and the food was generally excellent. The portions were generous, with a greater assortment of sides on the plate than most restaurants offer.

The New Yorker
60 W Market St, Salt Lake City, UT 84101, USA

http://www.newyorkerslc.com/

Date Visited : Jan 2018

Closed Oct 2018

PS: After a series of issues with a staff that contacted Hep A and caused mass contamination and eventually killed by shifting tastes in the city, the New Yorker closed on Oct 2018 . Sad to see it go, as there aren’t many fine dining restaurants in SLC.

0 comments on “The New Yorker @ SLC

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